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Blog - summary

Book Review by Steve Donoghue for Open Letters Monthly

Kara Cooney

Cooney is concerned throughout with uncovering the most elusive aspect of her subject: her humanity. This is impossible, of course, as Cooney must know as well as anybody – the sources don’t even begin to furnish enough material to be plumbing anybody’s psyche. But Cooney goes at it with gusto just the same...

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Kara writes for The Page 99 Test

Kara Cooney

I got lucky; Page 99 is the beginning of a new chapter entitled THE CLIMB TOWARD KINGSHIP – a clean break in Hatshepsut’s story, an obvious step forward her narrative of power consolidation – except that Hatshepsut’s story is anything but tidy and clear. It’s a mess of humanity and nuance as I conjecture the modus operandi of a woman dead 3500 years.

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Hatshepsut's Egypt, Biographile

Kara Cooney

Kara Cooney’s new biography The Woman Who Would Be King sets out to do for the little-known Egyptian ruler Hatshepsut what Stacy Schiff’s Cleopatra did for the more famous queen. We caught up with Cooney, a professor of Egyptian art and architecture at UCLA, to ask about the challenges of writing the life of a woman whose story is all but lost to history -- and to discover what this woman, who ruled as a pharaoh from the age of twenty, can teach us today about women in positions of power.

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Hatshepsut in Hollywood - Word & Film

Kara Cooney

We denizens of the twenty-first century sometimes forget history isn't as linear as chronological time - at least in terms of the progression of civil rights. We tend to believe, for example, that women have it better now than ever before. Certainly we assume females wield more political clout in this day and age. After all, just look at Hillary Clinton or Elizabeth Warren or, um, Sarah Palin. Right?

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